Lesson Eight

The Rest of the Bets

 

You’ve heard it said, “The best is saved for last!” That is not the case for the bets in Lesson Eight. However, you will not be disappointed. The bets covered in this lesson are the most risky having high odds against the bet to win. Thus, these bets tend to separate the player from their money faster. It is understood that for some lessons, learning from experience is the only way. Here is a short story about getting burned.

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It' a bad bet!

Teacher: “The stove is hot! Don’t touch the stove!” 

Novice: “Why?” 

Teacher: “I am trying to protect you from making a costly mistake.” 

Novice: “But Why? I want to see for myself.”

Teacher: “I don’t want you to be hurt. You will get burned if you don’t do as I say.”

Novice: “You just don’t want me to have any fun.” 

Teacher: “Suit yourself. Don’t listen to me, go ahead and touch the stove. See for yourself.” 

Novice: “Eeee yow! The stove is hot! I burned myself.” 

Teacher: “Ya think?” 

Okay, that’s the short version for Lesson Eight. The longer version is almost as short. If you plan to be on the winning side, you’ll not touch these longshot bets. The math guarantees you will lose more than you will win over the long run. Besides being long shots, the House charges a huge vig on these bets.

First, these high vig bets do not figure into a sustained and profitable betting strategy. The payout is too little for the risk and exposure to the odds. Think of it like this; to incorporate the plays outlined here, as part of your playing strategy, well, it’s like crossing Las Vegas Boulevard blind folded on a Saturday night. 

Next, think of these bets as over exaggerated, bad risks, dressed up to look pretty. It reminds me of being on the road, passing through a new town, looking for a good place to eat. Usually there is a café advertising, “Best food in the state - Home cooking - Just like mama’s.” Seldom does this overstated advertisement turn out to be true. In the first place, if café did have the best food, everyone in the town would know it to be true. The parking lot would be filled, as evidence, and the joint would be busy all the time. There would be no need to over exaggerate the advertising. Get it? The layout on a craps table is designed as a marketing ploy. The bets that are really not the “best bets in town” are the one prominently advertised on the layout. They are also aggressively sold in a loud, enticing voice by the stickman. “Come on! Step right up. Touch a hot stove. Make a high risk bet and get yourself an ouwie!” Enough with the sarcasm. Let’s get this wrapped up.

 

 

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The Field Bet

Let's begin with the Field Bet

The Field Bet is a one-roll bet that wins when any number in the Field rolls, 2-3-4-9-10-11-12. A Field Bet pays even money except for the 2 and 12, which pay double. Occasionally, you will find a game that pays triple on either the 2 or 12, but rarely both. At first, the Field Bet seems like a gift to the players. So many ways to win! Guess what? There is a reason that so much real estate is given up to the Field Bet on the layout. The intention is to make this bet very appealing to the player. Plus, the bet is self-service. Just reach in and drop your bet down. The truth is, there are 16 ways to win. However, there are 20 ways to lose. Of the 20 ways to lose, 5-6-7-8 are the losing numbers. The bet is a 5:4 underdog. Couple that with the fact that the bet is a one roll bet and is paid even money, (excepting 2 and 12). The House Advantage with this bet is all uphill for the player. 44.5% of the time a Field Bet wins to the 55.5% of the time that it will lose. Would you risk your life crossing a street blindfolded with a 44.5% chance of success?

Next the Big 6 and 8 Bet.

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Big 6 and 8

 

The Big 6 and Big 8 is nothing more than hype and a big rip. Again, this is another self-service type bet. Simply bet any amount to be paid even money. Unlike the Field Bet, Big 6 and 8 stay up until a seven is rolled. The bet is always working. Hopefully you will not see this bet on the layout. Most players know this to be a bad investment. Only a complete novice would make this even money bet. For this reason, casinos are making better use of the real estate. If you must bet 6 and 8, then make a Place Bet and at least receive the House Odds. You face the same risk, but you get a better payout with a Place Bet. Plus, Place Bets are not working on a Come Out Roll. Vig is about 9%

The Hardway Bets.

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Hardway Bets 4, 6, 8, 10

The Proposition Bets.

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Proposition Bets - Craps, Eleven and Horn

Gee, why are they called Hardway Bets? There are four numbers involved with the Hardway Bet. They are 4-6-8-10. A Hardway is a number rolled in pairs, 2/2, 3/3, 4/4 and 5/5. There is only one way to roll a hard 4, a hard 6, a hard 8, or a hard 10. Besides the 7, all of the easy ways for each of these numbers will cause the bet to lose as well. So, you have one way to win versus all the ways to lose with the seven and the easy ways. 

There are 6+4 ways for a Hard 6 or 8 to lose. (six sevens and the four easy ways) 

There are 6+2 ways for the 4 or 10 to lose. (six sevens and the two easy ways) 

Although the Hardway Bets are a favorite with some players, I discourage Hardway Betting unless you feel a need to support the casino’s bottom line. Hot stove! Note the payout: 10 for 1 and 8 for 1. This allows for the House’s vigorish. True Odds are 10 to 1 and 8 to 1.

 

 

The proposition bets are the casino's favorites. These are the bets that keep the casino lights burning bright and all the fancy stuff trimmed. Keeping this explanation appropriately short, you may look up the definition of proposition if you do not understand its meaning. These bets on Craps (2 3, 12) and Eleven come with a high vig. They are one-roll bets that will cost you more than you can ever hope to win. Yet, players love these bets. Play them if you love to lose.

A Horn Bet is a faster way to lose your money. It is a one roll bet on the 2-3-11 and 12. This is a high vig bet and is certainly not recommended. Instead, use your money to tip the cocktail server. 

Horn High Bet: Instead of digging out four units to cover the four Horn numbers, the player tosses out a five unit chip with instructions for the extra unit to be bet on the number called out. The bet is made in multiples of 5 with one unit on three of the horn numbers, and two units “high” on a specified Horn number, 2-3-11- or 12).  Example. You say, “$5 Horn High 12": $1 each on 2, 3, 11, and $2 on the 12. Better to save the $5 for the valet. 

In a Nut Shell - The Rest of the Bets 

Hop Bet: A Hop Bet is close to a hope bet. It is a call bet, not printed on the layout. A one roll bet on a specific result for a number. The bet is made with the boxman and the chips tossed in the air to the boxman or stickman, like you don’t care. (And you might as well not) The likelihood that your guess is going to roll next is a Hope at best. Hop 5/4 or 6/3 is betting that any combination for “9” will roll next. Hopping is hopeless!

Horn Bet: A one roll bet on the 2-3-11 and 12. This is a high vig bet and is certainly not recommended. Instead, use your money to tip the cocktail server.

Horn High Bet: Instead of digging out four units to cover the four Horn numbers, the player tosses out a five unit chip with instructions for the extra unit to be bet on the number called out. The bet is made in multiples of 5 with one unit on three of the horn numbers, and two units “high” on a specified Horn number, 2-3-11- or 12).  Example. You say, “$5 Horn High 12": $1 each on 2, 3, 11, and $2 on the 12. Better to save the $5 for the valet’s tip.

Whirl Bet: Not worth the time it takes to explain the bet. A one roll bet that 2-3-7-11- or 12, is rolled next. The bet is made in multiples of $5, one unit on each of the numbers. It is better to save the $5 for cab fare.

Lay Bets: When Laying money on 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, or 10 you are betting that a 7 is rolled before the number(s) with the lay bet. The vig is 5% of the winnings on this bet. Best when the 5% commission is paid after the bet wins. Some casinos collect the vig up front. A winning bet is paid true odds less the commission. House edge 3.03% on 4/10, 2.5% on 5/9, and 1.82% on 6/8. There are better ways of making a play, betting that the dice will not pass. Read the lessons on Don’t Pass and Don’t Come. The vig on a Lay Bet (5%) is too high.

Buy Bets: You really are buying or paying a fee to the casino in order to make this play. Player pays a 5% commission for True Odds on a Place Bet. Some casinos collect the commission on only winning bets, this is preferred. Casinos that collect the commission in advance are taking advantage of you. If you must make a buy bet, only buy the 4 or 10 and, with a bet of $20 or more so, the True Odds are worthwhile. I do not recommend making Buy Bets on the other box numbers.

Hopefully, you get the idea that the bets explained in this lesson greatly benefit the casino and should be ignored and avoided like… well, a hot stove. Look up the math if you doubt that the stove is hot. Oh, if I missed any other tourist bets, it was intentional. If you don’t know, don’t go. Enough said on this subject, let’s move on to the next lesson.

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In the next and last installment, Lesson Nine, I will explain how much it costs to play Dice. Until then, leave the tourist bets to the tourists. You now have the knowledge to play smart by making the smart moves. Wasn't that Simple?

 

Lesson 9

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